What are the newer options for patients who fail first- and second-generation TKI therapies?

FAQ Library  published on October 9, 2015
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What are the newer options for patients who fail first- and second-generation TKI therapies?

We have certainly made a lot of progress in our treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. The development of imatinib, a TKI therapy specifically developed against the BCR-ABL fusion protein, was a revolutionary advance and changed the lives of most of our patients. We then developed dasatinib and nilotinib, second-generation agents which could be used to salvage patients who are not doing well with imatinib and now are even used first line. More recently, bosutinib, another second-generation agent, has been developed to treat patients who are not responding to first-line therapy. The medication is well tolerated, with diarrhea being the major toxicity which can easily be overcome with fluids and Imodium. More recently, we have also developed a third-generation agent, ponatinib, which has expanded activity against mutations including the T315I, and now we have a non-TKI therapy, omacetaxine, which is given subcutaneously that controls patients mostly on a hematologic basis for patients with advanced CML and those patients who have T315I mutation.

For more information on managing your patients with CML, and to participate in an interactive case study in which you’ll be able to make clinical decisions for a patient with CP-CML, please view the activity available here.
Last modified: October 8, 2015